A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
Entry in progress—BP (1/28)
Entry in progress—BP (1/28)
“Starting your day with an early morning run is a great way to make sure your day can’t get worse” (1/28)
“Every law passed is another freedom lost” (1/28)
Entry in progress—BP (1/28)
More new entries...

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z


Entry from August 29, 2019
“Tearing up the pea patch” (a team is doing very well)

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wikipedia: Red Barber
Walter Lanier “Red” Barber (February 17, 1908 – October 22, 1992) was an American sportscaster.

Barber, nicknamed “The Ol’ Redhead”, was primarily identified with radio broadcasts of Major League Baseball, calling play-by-play across four decades with the Cincinnati Reds (1934–38), Brooklyn Dodgers (1939–1953), and New York Yankees (1954–1966). Like his fellow sports pioneer Mel Allen, Barber also gained a niche calling college and professional football in his primary market of New York City.
(...)
Brooklyn Dodgers
Barber had been hired by Larry MacPhail, then president of the Reds. When MacPhail moved on to be president of the Dodgers for the 1939 season, he took the play-by-play man along. In Brooklyn, Barber became an institution, widely admired for his folksy style. He was also appreciated by people concerned about Brooklyn’s reputation as a land of “dees” and “dems”.

Barber became famous for his signature catchphrases, including these:
(...)
“They’re tearin’ up the pea patch” – used for a team on a winning streak.

14 May 1940, Brooklyn (NY) Eagle, “Jo Ranson’s Radio Dial Log: ‘Red’ Barber’s Lingo Gets an Analysis,” pg. 10, col. 6:
“The boys are tearing up the pea patch”: Team is functioning effectively.

10 August 1940, Daily News (New York, NY), “Listening In” by Sid Shalit, pg. 23, col. 6:
Doing a satisfactory reportorial job on the unpredictable Brooklyn Dodgers is a man-sized job. WOR’s Red Barber himself, has become as colorful as the team he covers, particularly his unique vocabulary. Sample Barberisms: “The boys are tearing up the pea patch,” meaning the club is red hot; “In the catbird seat,” meaning the Durochermen are out in front, sitting pretty; and the soul-stirring rallying cry along the Gowanus—“F. O. B.,” meaniung the bases are loaded with run-hungry Dodgers.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • Thursday, August 29, 2019 • Permalink