A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from February 25, 2021
“The closest some of us will ever get to heaven” (World Trade Center)

The World Trade Center was opened in 1973, and was destroyed during attacks on September 11, 2001. A 1980 promotion by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (the WTC owner) stated:

“The closest some of us will ever get to heaven.”


Wikipedia: World Trade Center (1973-2001)
The original World Trade Center was a large complex of seven buildings in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, United States. It opened on April 4, 1973, and was destroyed in 2001 during the September 11 attacks. At the time of their completion, the Twin Towers—the original 1 World Trade Center (the North Tower), at 1,368 feet (417 m); and 2 World Trade Center (the South Tower), at 1,362 feet (415.1 m)—were the tallest buildings in the world. Other buildings in the complex included the Marriott World Trade Center (3 WTC), 4 WTC, 5 WTC, 6 WTC, and 7 WTC. The complex contained 13,400,000 square feet (1,240,000 m2) of office space.

OCLC WorldCat record
The closest some of us will ever get to heaven : the World Trade Center New York.
Author: Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
Publisher: [New York?] : [Port Authority of New York and New Jersey], [1980?]
Edition/Format: Print book : English

Google Books
Title The Closest Some of Us Will Ever Get to Heaven: The World Trade Center New York
Contributor Port Authority of New York and New Jersey
Publisher Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, 1980
Length 1 pages

17 May 1982, Broadcast (London, UK), “Alternatives” by John Marshall, pg. 36, col. 1:
Lying flat on the New York pavement, the spires of the World Trade Centre rise a quarter of a mile above you. “The closest some of us will ever get to heaven”, runs the publicity puff.

Twitter
Rick Wilson
@TheRickWilson
An old brochure for the World Trade Center. Eerie now. http://i.imgur.com/Mte0ygV.jpg
)The following text is shown on an image.—ed.)
The closest
some of us
will ever get
to heaven.
THE WORLD
TRADE CENTER
NEW YORK
8:07 PM · Sep 10, 2014·iOS

mcbrooklyn
wednesday, september 10, 2014
Pre-Sept. 11 World Trade Center Brochure Sends Shivers Up Your Spine
This pre-Sept. 11, 2001 brochure with the words, “The closest some of us will ever get to heaven” is just plain freaky.

Twitter
911bot
@911b0t
(The following text is shown on an image.—ed.)
The closest
some of us
will ever get
to heaven.
THE WORLD
TRADE CENTER
NEW YORK
This 1970’s print ad for the WTC is also rather creepy for several reasons, mainly because it implies that a whole lot of people in these towers are NOT going to heaven. Spearheaded by David Rockerfeller (sic) in 1959, the WTC was inaugurated by Governor Nelson Rockefeller (David’s brother) amd housed some of the world’s biggest elite-owned finance firms. The WTC was indeed the closest some of them will ever get to heaven.
8:59 AM · Feb 25, 2021·911b0t

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityBuildings/Housing/Parks • Thursday, February 25, 2021 • Permalink