A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from May 08, 2020
“The House That Tex Built” (Madison Square Garden, 1925-1968)

Entry in progress—B.P.

“The House That Jack Built” is a traditional nursery rhyme.

Boyle’s Thirty Acres (1921 to 1927) in Jersey City, New Jersey, was a boxing arena that was also called “The House That Tex Built.” The original Yankee Stadium was called “The House That Ruth Built.”


Wikipedia: Madison Square Garden (1925)
Madison Square Garden (MSG III) was an indoor arena in New York City, the third bearing that name. It was built in 1925 and closed in 1968, and was located on the west side of Eighth Avenue between 49th and 50th Streets in Manhattan, on the site of the city’s trolley-car barns. It was the first Garden that was not located near Madison Square. MSG III was the home of the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League and the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association, and also hosted numerous boxing matches, the Millrose Games, concerts, and other events

Groundbreaking
Groundbreaking on the third Madison Square Garden took place on January 9, 1925. Designed by the noted theater architect Thomas W. Lamb, it was built at the cost of $4.75 million in 349 days by boxing promoter Tex Rickard, who assembled backers he called his “600 millionaires” to fund the project. The new arena was dubbed “The House That Tex Built.” In contrast to the ornate towers of Stanford White’s second Garden, the exterior of MSG III was a simple box.

Wikipedia: Tex Rickard
George Lewis “Tex” Rickard (January 2, 1870 – January 6, 1929) was an American boxing promoter, founder of the New York Rangers of the National Hockey League (NHL), and builder of the third incarnation of Madison Square Garden in New York City. During the 1920s, Tex Rickard was the leading promoter of the day, and he has been compared to P. T. Barnum and Don King. Sports journalist Frank Deford has written that Rickard “first recognized the potential of the star system."[1] Rickard also operated several saloons, hotels, and casinos, all named Northern and located in Alaska, Nevada, and Canada.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • Friday, May 08, 2020 • Permalink