A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from June 26, 2018
“The worst thing about running the Chinese Marathon? Hitting the Wall”

Marathon runners often suffer from fatigue and hit “the wall,” but it’s usually not the Great Wall of China. “I’v just got home after taking part in the Chinese Marathon. It was hell. After 18 miles I hit ‘The Wall’” was posted on Twitter by Andy Jarvis on November 4, 2010.

“The worst thing about running the Chinese Marathon? Hitting the Wall” was posted on Twitter by Tony Cowards on December 21, 2010.


Wikipedia: Hitting the wall
In endurance sports such as cycling and running, hitting the wall or the bonk is a condition of sudden fatigue and loss of energy which is caused by the depletion of glycogen stores in the liver and muscles. Milder instances can be remedied by brief rest and the ingestion of food or drinks containing carbohydrates

Wikipedia: Great Wall of China
The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, tamped earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese states and empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steppe with an eye to expansion. Several walls were being built as early as the 7th century BC;[2] these, later joined together and made bigger and stronger, are collectively referred to as the Great Wall.

Seattle (WA) Times
Runners in Chinese marathon really will “hit the Wall”
Originally published May 18, 2007 at 12:00 am Updated May 18, 2007 at 11:46 am
In every marathon, there is the psychological barrier of “hitting the wall. “ In the Great Wall Marathon, it really happens. China’s most famous symbol…
By STEPHEN WADE
AP Sports Writer
KUAIHUOLIN, China — In every marathon, there is the psychological barrier of “hitting the wall.” In the Great Wall Marathon, it really happens.

Twitter
Andy Jarvis
@StockportRed
I’v just got home after taking part in the Chinese Marathon. It was hell. After 18 miles I hit ‘The Wall’ #win100
5:12 AM - 4 Nov 2010

Twitter
Tony Cowards
@TonyCowards
The worst thing about running the Chinese Marathon? Hitting the Wall.
6:14 AM - 21 Dec 2010

Twitter
Tony Cowards
@TonyCowards
The worst thing about running the Chinese Marathon? Hitting the Wall.
9:57 AM - 19 Sep 2011

Twitter
Nigel Bayley
@babydrums
I once ran the Chinese Marathon. Unfortunately, after 16 miles, I hit the wall.
12:30 PM - 12 Oct 2011

17 June 2015, Journal (Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK), “Being an ethical business is about more than charity” by Glyn Evans, pg. 3:
WHAT’S the toughest part of the Chinese marathon? It’s that moment when you hit the wall!

Twitter
Bob Swanston
@SwanstonRobert
A few years ago I ran in the Chinese Marathon.
The toughest bit was when I hit the wall.
5:26 AM - 21 Feb 2017 from Islington, London

Twitter
Tony Cowards
@TonyCowards
The worst thing about running the Chinese Marathon is hitting the wall.
#punderdog
8:56 AM - 22 Aug 2017

Twitter
Bob Swanston
@SwanstonRobert
#tuesdaytitters #1pun
I’ve run quite a lot of races over the years but the toughest one so far was the Chinese Marathon.
It was that moment that I hit the wall.
2:39 AM - 5 Jun 2018

Twitter
Shit Jokes
@ShitJokes
What’s the toughest part of the Chinese Marathon?
That moment you hit the wall.
4:04 AM - 27 Jun 2018

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityExercise/Running/Health Clubs • Tuesday, June 26, 2018 • Permalink