A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“People cheating on their taxes disgust me. This is not the world I want to raise my 23 dependents” (1/22)
“A taco is a fish love letter in a corn envelope that you mail to your stomach” (1/22)
“A taco is a beef love letter in a corn envelope that you mail to your stomach” (1/21)
“I got in trouble at a park for lining squirrels up by height. They didn’t like me critter sizing” (1/21)
“I tried to buy a hot dog with ketchup, but the vendor would only accept cash” (1/21)
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Entry from August 14, 2016
“When a man tells you that he got rich through hard work, ask him: ‘Whose?‘“

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wikipedia: Don Marquis
Donald Robert Perry Marquis (/ˈmɑːrkwɪs/ mar-kwis; July 29, 1878 in Walnut, Illinois – December 29, 1937 in New York City) was a humorist, journalist, and author. He was variously a novelist, poet, newspaper columnist, and playwright. He is remembered best for creating the characters “Archy” and “Mehitabel”, supposed authors of humorous verse. During his lifetime he was equally famous for creating another fictitious character, “the Old Soak,” who was the subject of two books, a hit Broadway play (1922–23), a silent movie (1926) and a talkie (1937).

2 June 1925, New York (NY) Herald Tribune, “The Lantern” by Don Marquis, pg. 16, col. 4:
When Croesus tells you he got rich through hard work ask him “Whose?”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityWork/Businesses • Sunday, August 14, 2016 • Permalink