A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from April 21, 2019
“Why do we color Easter eggs?"/"Because Jesus dyed for your sins.”

A riddle about Easter eggs is:

Q: Why do we color Easter eggs?
A: Because Jesus dyed for your sins.


“Always remember, Jesus dyed Easter eggs for your sins” was posted on Twitter by Zac Clark on April 12, 2009. “Why do we decorate Easter eggs? because Jesus dyed for our sins” was posted on Twitter by doz on April 20, 2014. “Why do we color Easter eggs? Because Jesus dyed for your sins” was posted on Reddit—Jokes on April 21, 2019.

“Why do we paint Easter eggs?"/"Because it’s easier than trying to wallpaper them” is another Easter egg riddle.


Wikipedia: Easter egg
Easter eggs, also called Paschal eggs, are eggs that are sometimes decorated. They are usually used as gifts on the occasion of Easter. As such, Easter eggs are common during the season of Eastertide (Easter season). The oldest tradition is to use dyed and painted chicken eggs, but a modern custom is to substitute chocolate eggs wrapped in colored foil, hand-carved wooden eggs, or plastic eggs filled with confectionery such as chocolate. However, real eggs continue to be used in Central and Eastern European tradition. Although eggs, in general, were a traditional symbol of fertility and rebirth, in Christianity, for the celebration of Eastertide, Easter eggs symbolize the empty tomb of Jesus, from which Jesus resurrected. In addition, one ancient tradition was the staining of Easter eggs with the colour red “in memory of the blood of Christ, shed as at that time of his crucifixion.” This custom of the Easter egg can be traced to early Christians of Mesopotamia, and from there it spread into Russia and Siberia through the Orthodox Churches, and later into Europe through the Catholic and Protestant Churches. This Christian use of eggs may have been influenced by practices in “pre-dynastic period in Egypt, as well as amid the early cultures of Mesopotamia and Crete.”

Twitter
Zac Clark
@capt_clark89
Always remember, Jesus dyed Easter eggs for your sins.
9:37 AM - 12 Apr 2009

Twitter
nino9
@nino9
Jesus Dyed For Your Sins! (Easter Eggs)
10:58 PM - 10 May 2009

Twitter
Andrew Hunt
@Mr_AndrewHunt
Jesus dyed (Easter eggs) for our sins.
12:24 PM - 3 Apr 2010

Twitter
Zac Clark
@capt_clark89
Remember that on Easter, Jesus dyed Easter eggs for your sins.
2:23 AM - 4 Apr 2010

Twitter
hamjob
@hamjob
Jesus dyed Easter eggs for your sins.
11:41 AM - 4 Apr 2010

Twitter
Joshua Riggins
@JoshuaRiggins
Remember, Jesus Dyed Easter eggs for your sin… Happy Easter wink
9:37 AM - 8 Apr 2012

Twitter
Sarah
@BIG_RED_101
“We should dye Easter eggs on Good Friday instead because that’s when Jesus DYED for us” #talesofgramps #ohboy
3:08 PM - 30 Mar 2013

Twitter
doz
@dezzirayy
why do we decorate Easter eggs?
because Jesus dyed for our sins.
12:19 PM - 20 Apr 2014

Twitter
Todd Nuke ‘Em
@X96todd
Jesus dyed Easter eggs for your sins. (Joke stolen from The Simpsons.)
10:51 AM - 5 Apr 2015

Twitter
drewtarvin
@drewtarvin
If I understand the tradition of Easter eggs correctly, it’s to remind us that Jesus dyed for our sins.
10:02 AM - 16 Apr 2017

Twitter
Kaitlyn
@kaaitlynnx
Do we color Easter eggs because Jesus dyed for our sins?
7:59 PM - 1 Apr 2018

Reddit—Jokes
Posted by u/bennetthaselton April 21, 2019
Why do we color Easter eggs?
Because Jesus dyed for your sins.

Happy Easter!
qyrion
Coloring eggs is a pagan celebration in honor of the Celtic goddess Ostara. Nothing to do with the Christian tradition.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Sunday, April 21, 2019 • Permalink