A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

Recent entries:
“The Royal Albert Hall is the only place a modern composer can hear his music twice” (5/21)
“The Royal Albert Hall is the only place a modern composer can hear his music twice” (5/21)
“Anything is popsicle when I’m with you” (5/21)
“Skiiing: I do not participate in any sport with ambulances at the bottom of a hill” (5/20)
“Success is outliving your failures” (5/20)
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Entry from May 21, 2019
“The Royal Albert Hall is the only place a modern composer can hear his music twice”

Entry in progress—B.P.

Wikipedia: Royal Albert Hall
The Royal Albert Hall is a concert hall on the northern edge of South Kensington, London, and is one of the UK’s most treasured and distinctive buildings. The Hall is a registered charity held in trust for the nation, and receives no public or government funding. It can seat 5,267.

Since the hall’s opening by Queen Victoria in 1871, the world’s leading artists from many performance genres have appeared on its stage. It is the venue for some of the most notable events in British culture, in particular the Proms concerts, which have been held there every summer since 1941. It is host to more than 390 shows in the main auditorium annually, including classical, rock and pop concerts, ballet, opera, film screenings with live orchestral accompaniment, sports, awards ceremonies, school and community events, and charity performances and banquets.

Google Books
The Daily Book of Classical Music: 365 Readings that Teach, Inspire & Entertain
By Leslie Chew, Dwight DeReiter, Cathy Doheny, Colin Gilbert, Greenwood, Travers Huff, Susanna Loewy, Melissa Maples, Jeff McQuilkin and Scott Spiegelberg
Pg. 35:
Sir Thomas Beecham, the orchestral conductor known for his sense of humor, half-joked that the Royal Albert Hall was “the only place a modern composer could hear his music twice.

PSN Europe
Eliminating the echo: A look inside the Royal Albert Hall’s new 465-speaker system
The Royal Albert Hall’s new 465-speaker d&b audiotechnik system, happening to be the biggest single-room audio installation in the world, finally delivers sound fit for a prince

FIONA HOPE May 21, 2019
There’s an old joke about the Royal Albert Hall, the venerable Victorian venue on the southern edge of London’s Hyde Park, that says it’s “the only place where a British composer could be sure of hearing his work twice”. In fact, the hall’s infamous echo – a consequence of its original glass roof – has been almost eradicated in the 148 years since it opened: first, by cladding the glass dome in fluted aluminium panels, and later with its famous disc-shaped fibreglass acoustic diffusers, known affectionately as the ‘mushrooms’, which were installed in 1969.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityMusic/Dance/Theatre/Film • Tuesday, May 21, 2019 • Permalink


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