A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from January 09, 2023
Brooklyn Bombers (Brooklyn Dodgers nickname)

“Bronx Bombers” is the famous nickname of the New York Yankees of the American League. The Brooklyn baseball team in the National League (nicknamed the “Robins” and “Dodgers”) was sometimes called the “Brooklyn Bombers.”
   
“These closing-inning rallies are rapidly getting to be old stuff with the Brooklyn bombers” was written by M. W. Corum (Bill Corum, 1895-1958) in the New York (NY) Times on June 8, 1925. “But wait—wait until those Brooklyn Bombers start banging that baseball” was printed in the syndicated column “Hooks and Slides” by William Braucher in The Vidette-Messenger (Valparaiso, IN) on April 30, 1931. “Brooklyn Bombers Uncork Sizzling Attack to Turn Back Pittsburgh, 11 to 6” was a headline printed in the Muskogee (OK) Daily Phoenix on August 16, 1932. “BROOKLYN BOMBERS—Snapped together are Hack Wilson and Danny Taylor, ex-Cubs, now leading Brooklyn sluggers” was a photo caption in The Herald-News (Passaic, NJ) and many other newspapers on August 29, 1932.
 
     
Wikipedia: Brooklyn Dodgers
The Brooklyn Dodgers were a Major League Baseball team founded in 1884 as a member of the American Association before joining the National League in 1890. They remained in Brooklyn until 1957, after which the club moved to Los Angeles, California, where it continues its history as the Los Angeles Dodgers. The team moved west at the same time as its longtime rival, the New York Giants, moved to San Francisco in northern California as the San Francisco Giants.
 
8 June 1925, New York (NY) Times, pg. 11, col. 5:
ROBINS TAME CUBS
THIRD TIME IN ROW
(...)
By M. W. CORUM
(...)
These closing-inning rallies are rapidly getting to be old stuff with the Brooklyn bombers.
 
Newspapers.com
30 April 1931, The Vidette-Messenger (Valparaiso, IN), “Hooks and Slides” by William Braucher, pg. 8, col. 4:
But wait—wait until those Brooklyn Bombers start banging that baseball.
 
Newspapers.com
16 August 1932, Muskogee (OK) Daily Phoenix, pg. 6, col. 3:
PIRATES ARE BEATEN
BY HUSTLING DODGERS
Brooklyn Bombers Uncork Sizzling
Attack to Turn Back Pitts-
burgh, 11 to 6

 
Newspapers.com
23 August 1932, Logansport (IN) Pharos-Tribune, “Pennant Bee Buzzes in Brooklyn,” pg. 7, col. 4:
The most spectacular feature of his Dodgers’ spurt has been the tremendous stick-work of the famous Brooklyn Bomber, Francis Xavier O’Doul.
 
Newspapers.com
29 August 1932, The Herald-News (Passaic, NJ), pg. 14, right masthead photo caption:
BROOKLYN BOMBERS—Snapped together are Hack Wilson and Danny Taylor, ex-Cubs, now leading Brooklyn sluggers.

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CitySports/Games • Monday, January 09, 2023 • Permalink


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