A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeye's fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from May 10, 2017
“Is a cul-de-sac a spoon in the road?”

"Fork in the road” is a term, but what about “spoon in the road”? “Was walking, came to a fork in the road, and took the one less traveled. Then I came to a spoon in the road, and called it a cul-de-sac” was posted on Twitter on June 2, 2010. “So, how come a cul-de-sac isn’t called a spoon in the road?” was posted on Twitter on August 23, 2011.

“If a place where the road splits is a “fork in the road”, would a cul-de-sac be a spoon in the road?” was posted on Reddit—Shower Thoughts on July 12, 2014. “There’s a fork in the road. A spoon in the road could be a cul-de-sac. So, a spork in the road is a roundabout” was posted on Twitter on March 21, 2017.

“Building cul-de-sacs is a dead end job” and “I live on a cul-de-sac, which is French for ‘Everybody here is white‘“ are other cul-de-sac sayings.


Wikipedia: Dead end (street)
A dead end, also known as a cul-de-sac (/ˈkʌldəsæk, ˈkʊl-/, from French for ‘bag-bottom’ ), no through road or no exit road, is a street with only one inlet or outlet.

The term “dead end” is understood in all varieties of English, but the official terminology and traffic signs include many different alternatives. Some of these are used only regionally. In the United States and other countries, cul-de-sac is often not an exact synonym for dead end and refers to dead ends with a circular end, allowing for easy turning at the end of the road. In Australia and Canada, they are usually referred to as a court when they have a bulbous end.

Twitter
Hunter‏
@FrenzyHunter
was walking, came to a fork in the road, and took the one less traveled. Then I came to a spoon in the road, and called it a cul-de-sac.
10:53 PM - 2 Jun 2010

Twitter
Easy D‏
@danmoser1961
So, how come a cul-de-sac isn’t called a spoon in the road? #LNK
6:04 AM - 23 Aug 2011

Twitter
Laura with an M‏
@skorty_spice
So, there are “forks” in the road. Is a cul de sac considered a “spoon” in the road?
8:56 AM - 7 Jul 2012

Twitter
Pete & Sour‏
@peterpixels
‘A cul-de-sac is just a spoon in the road’
5:49 PM - 10 May 2013

Reddit—Shower Thoughts
If a place where the road splits is a “fork in the road”, would a cul-de-sac be a spoon in the road?
submitted July 12, 2014 by RedTheSnappe

Twitter
I hate the number 32‏
@KPageIsGreat
There’s a fork in the road. A spoon in the road could be a cul-de-sac. So, a spork in the road is a roundabout.
12:46 PM - 21 Mar 2017

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityStreets • Wednesday, May 10, 2017 • Permalink