A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006.

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Entry from August 09, 2017
“A rosé by any other name would taste as sweet”

"What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other word would smell as sweet,” is a famous line from William Shakespeare’s play, Romeo and Juliet. The line has been frequently used as a pun on rosé wine.

“A rosé by any other name would taste the same” was cited in print in 1986. “A rosé by any other name would taste as sweet” was printed in a 1999 newspaper. “A rosé by any other name would taste as dry” was printed in a 2017 newspaper.


Wikipedia: Rosé
A rosé (from French rosé; also known as rosada in Portugal and Spanish-speaking countries and rosato in Italy) is a type of wine that incorporates some of the color from the grape skins, but not enough to qualify it as a red wine. It may be the oldest known type of wine, as it is the most straightforward to make with the skin contact method. The pink color can range from a pale “onion-skin” orange to a vivid near-purple, depending on the varietals used and winemaking techniques. There are three major ways to produce rosé wine: skin contact, saignée, and blending. Rosé wines can be made still, semi-sparkling or sparkling and with a wide range of sweetness levels from highly dry Provençal rosé to sweet White Zinfandels and blushes. Rosé wines are made from a wide variety of grapes and can be found all around the globe.

Wikipedia: A rose by any other name would smell as sweet
“A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” is a popular reference to William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, in which Juliet seems to argue that it does not matter that Romeo is from her rival’s house of Montague, that is, that he is named “Montague.” The reference is often used to imply that the names of things do not affect what they really are. This formulation is, however, a paraphrase of Shakespeare’s actual language, seen underlined below. This scene is called the balcony scene by many people. Juliet not only makes the statement above but compares Romeo to a rose saying that if he wasn’t named Romeo he would still be handsome and be Juliet’s Love. Also as said before this states that if he wasn’t Romeo, then he wouldn’t be a Montague and she would be able to get married with no problem at all.
(...)
Juliet:
What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other word would smell as sweet; ...


Google Books
Milwaukee Magazine
Volume 11, Issues 7-12
1986
Pg. 3:
111 Wine & Spirits A rosé by any other name would taste the same. by Michael Muckian

10 July 1999, The Globe and Mail (Toronto, ON), “A rosé by any other name would taste as sweet” by David Lawrason, pg. D5:
A rosé by any other name would taste as sweet.

Google Groups: alt.usage.english
A rosé by any other name
Stuart Chapman
6/18/07
....that which we call a rosé
By any other name would taste as sweet…

Palm Springs (CA) Life
Wine
Days of Rosés and Roses

JANICE KLEINSCHMIDT. JANUARY 31, 2008 RESTAURANTS
(...)
To my way of thinking (to paraphrase the ultimate romantic), “A rosé by any other name would taste as sweet” — thus, my proclivity to steer away from anything that looks even remotely like the sweet white zinfandel favored by those I’ll call “the uninformed.”

Independent (London, UK)
THE WAR OF THE ROSÉS
A scheme to industrialise the production of rosé, and beat the New World at its own game, has provoked a furious response from traditional producers in France. John Lichfield reports from Faye d’Anjou
Saturday 28 March 2009 00:00 GMT
Olivier Lecomte poured out a generous glass of Cabernet d’Anjou, which blushed deep pink with a hint of gold. “What you have there,” he said “is a true rosé wine. A wine made with the heart.” According to the European Commission, a rosé by any other name would taste as sweet or, rather, as “demi-sec”. But would it be a true rosé, made with the heart?

Twitter
JoshuaLawrence‏
@JoshuaLawrence
A rosé by any other name http://carbonara.wordpress.com/ would taste as sweet?
5:58 PM - 27 Jan 2010

Twitter
IDGAF‏
@NVLuv
A rosé by any other name would taste as sweet.
- Drunk Shakespeare
#MakeAQuoteThirsty
2:49 PM - 20 Sep 2016

ZINC (Modern American Food)
A ROSÉ BY ANY OTHER NAME WOULD TASTE AS SWEET
March 15, 2017
Despite the inches and inches of snow on the ground and the below freezing temperatures, Spring is right around the corner. Believe it or not, March 20 is the first day of Spring and in our books, that means it’s the beginning of Rosé season.

Kansas City (MO) Star
A rosé by any other name would taste as dry
BY DAVE ECKERT
Special to The Star
JULY 14, 2017 7:00 AM
If you didn’t already know it, let me reinterate — I love rosés. They are bone dry, crisp and refreshing. I am clearly not alone in my “passion for the pink.” Premium rosés have never been more popular, with U.S. imports up nearly 40 percent, according to recent statistics. The growth of the rosé category in the states has outpaced that of all other wine categories for the last decade.

Twitter
Mass. Brew Bros.‏
@MassBrewBros
“What’s in a name? That which we call a “Rose” By any other name would taste as sweet.” @NightShiftBeer #MassBrewMonday
5:25 PM - 31 Jul 2017

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Wednesday, August 09, 2017 • Permalink