A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from April 07, 2021
“Arroz by any other name would smell as wheat”

“Arroz” (the Spanish word for “rice”) can sound like “a “rose.” “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” is a famous line from William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet.
   
“Arroz by any other name would smell as wheat” was posted on the newsgroup alt.buddha.short.fat.guy  on February 8, 1994. “Shakespeare knew a little Spanish. But he wasn’t much good at identifying grain by scent. He wrote: ‘Arroz, by another name, would smell as wheat.” was posted on Reddit—Puns on December 9, 2013. “Arroz, by any other name, would smell as rice, not as wheat” was posted on Twitter by Bruce Denby on January 16, 2019. “Arroz by another name, such as trigo, would smell as wheat” was posted on Twitter by Bruce Denby on June 13, 2020. 
   
“I buy store brand Spanish rice, not name brands. As they say, ‘Arroz by any other name…‘“ is a related joke.
   
   
Wikipedia: A rose by any other name would smell as sweet
“A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” is a popular reference to William Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, in which Juliet seems to argue that it does not matter that Romeo is from her family’s rival house of Montague, that is, that he is named “Montague”. The reference is often used to imply that the names of things do not affect what they really are. This formulation is, however, a paraphrase of Shakespeare’s actual language. Juliet compares Romeo to a rose saying that if he were not named Romeo he would still be handsome and be Juliet’s love. This states that if he were not Romeo, then he would not be a Montague and she would be able to marry him without hindrance.
     
Google Groups: alt.buddha.short.fat.guy 
Jesus was just a guy (a mean, nasty guy)
Lee Rudolph
Feb 8, 1994, 4:57:37 PM
Arroz by any other name would smell as wheat.
 
Google Groups: alt.humor.puns
Puns of the Weak 10-17-03
Stan Kegel
Oct 18, 2003, 12:25:47 AM
(...)
“Arroz by any other name would smell as wheat.” (Lee Jackson)
 
Reddit—Puns
Posted by u/lindleyw December 9, 2013
Shakespeare knew a little Spanish
But he wasn’t much good at identifying grain by scent. He wrote: “Arroz, by another name, would smell as wheat.”
           
Twitter
Joe Jaffa
@joejaffa
Shakespeare spoke Spanish. But he was horrible at identifying grain by scent. He wrote “Arroz, by any other name, would smell as wheat.”
5:48 PM · Dec 13, 2013·Twitter Web Client
     
Twitter
Mike Godwin
@sfmnemonic
Arroz by another name would not smell as wheat.
6:21 PM · May 4, 2014·Facebook
   
Twitter
Malavika Jayaram
@MalJayaram
Replying to @sfmnemonic
A new (gluten-free) Godwin’s Law: “Arroz by another name would not smell as wheat.” -
@sfmnemonic
6:44 PM · May 4, 2014·Twitter for iPhone
 
Twitter
Bruce Denby
@brucedenby
Arroz, by any other name, would smell as rice, not as wheat.
4:18 PM · Jan 16, 2019·Twitter for iPhone
 
Twitter   
Bruce Denby
@brucedenby
Arroz by another name, such as trigo, would smell as wheat.
12:51 PM · Jun 13, 2020·Twitter for iPhone
 
Twitter
Aric Sparticus
@AricSparticus
Arroz by any other name would still smell as wheat
6:49 PM · Oct 17, 2020·Twitter for iPhone

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityFood/Drink • Wednesday, April 07, 2021 • Permalink


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