A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

Recent entries:
“I will eat a bowl of water with a fork before I care what anyone thinks of me” (5/27)
“I’ll eat a bowl of water with a fork before I give a shit about your opinion of me” (5/27)
“I’ll eat a bowl of water with a fork before I give a damn about your opinion of me” (5/27)
“I’ll eat a bowl of water with a fork before I give a fuck about your opinion of me” (5/27)
“I’ll eat a bowl of water with a fork before I GAF about your opinion of me” (5/27)
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Entry from July 16, 2020
Chin Sail (face mask)

Entry in progress—B.P.
 
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Seattle (WA) Times
Everyone wore masks during the 1918 flu pandemic. They were useless.
April 2, 2020 at 4:32 am Updated April 2, 2020 at 5:42 am
By Eliza McGraw
The Washington Post
People called them “flu fences” and “chin sails.” Gala attendees fastened theirs with gaudy earrings. Smokers cut flaps in them, and movie houses gave them away with tickets.
 
During the influenza pandemic of 1918, officials often advised Americans to wear face masks in public. Doctors believed that masks could help prevent “spray infections,” according to historian John M. Barry in his book, “The Great Influenza: The Story of the Deadliest Pandemic in History.”

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityGovernment/Law/Military/Religion /Health • Thursday, July 16, 2020 • Permalink


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