A plaque remaining from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem.

Above, a 1934 plaque from the Big Apple Night Club at West 135th Street and Seventh Avenue in Harlem. Discarded as trash in 2006. Now a Popeyes fast food restaurant on Google Maps.

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Entry from March 15, 2023
The Most Jewish Spot on Earth (Brooklyn)

New York City is home to over one million Jews, and most live in the borough of Brooklyn.
       
“The New York borough of Brooklyn is the most Jewish place on Earth outside of Israel” was posted on WBEZ (Chicago, IL) in December 2015. “Great American Jewish Cities returns this week with perhaps the most Jewish place on earth” (Boro Park, Brooklyn) was posted on Twitter by Jewish History Soundbites on September 13, 2020.
       
“Brooklyn, the Most Jewish Spot on Earth” by Hilary Danailova was printed in Hadassah Magazine in January 2018, stating, ​“‘There are more Jews right now in Brooklyn than anywhere else in the world, including the city of Tel Aviv,’ said Ron Schweiger, the borough’s official historian. Not everyone agrees. “In 2018, Haddassah magazine, which has a Zionist bent, ran a story calling Brooklyn, the Most Jewish Place on Earth. Really?! That’s offensive. Especially when reading that in Yerushalayim” was written by David Walk in his blog at The Times of Israel. “Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn nicknamed ‘the most Jewish spot on Earth’ home to the world’s largest Jewish community” was posted on Twitter by Antar on January 20, 2023.
   
     
Wikipedia: Brooklyn
Brooklyn (/ˈbrʊklɪn/) is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Kings County, in the U.S. state of New York. Kings County is the most populous county in the State of New York, and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, behind New York County (Manhattan). Brooklyn is also New York City’s most populous borough,[6] with 2,736,074 residents in 2020.
 
Wikipedia: Jews in New York City
Jews in New York City comprise approximately 9 percent of the city’s population, making the Jewish community the largest in the world outside of Israel. As of 2016, 1.1 million Jews lived in the five boroughs of New York City, and over 1.75 million Jews lived in New York State overall.
 
(Photo caption.—ed.)
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn, nicknamed “the most Jewish spot on Earth”, and home to the world’s largest Jewish community, which with over 600,000 adherents living in the borough, greater than both Tel Aviv and Jerusalem,
 
Judaism is the second-largest religion practiced in New York City, with approximately 1.6 million adherents as of 2022, representing the largest Jewish community of any city in the world, greater than the combined totals of Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. Nearly half of the city’s Jews live in Brooklyn.
         
Twitter
Mealsandeals.eth
@Mealsandeals
Israel was great and all but I’m excited to get back to the most Jewish place on earth… Se ya tonight Long Island.
10:56 AM · May 18, 2014
   
Twitter
David Hatkoff
@DavidHatkoff
Forget temple on Yom Kippur, Murray’s Bagels on a Sunday morning is the most Jewish place on earth.
12:45 PM · Oct 5, 2014
 
Latino USA
WBEZ (Chicago, IL)
A Tale of Two Israelites
By DEBBIE NATHAN DEC 4, 2015 IDENTITY
The New York borough of Brooklyn is the most Jewish place on Earth outside of Israel, and nowhere is that more apparent than in the heavily Orthodox Jewish neighborhood of Borough Park.
 
Hadassah Magazine
Brooklyn, the Most Jewish Spot on Earth
By Hilary Danailova January 2018
(...)
​By any measure, Brooklyn is the most Jewish place in America. Approximately 600,000 Jews now call the borough home, down from an incredible 900,000 in the 1940s. One in four Brooklyn residents is Jewish, the largest proportion by far among New York City’s five boroughs, according to the most recent survey by the UJA-Federation of New York.
 
​“There are more Jews right now in Brooklyn than anywhere else in the world, including the city of Tel Aviv,” said Ron Schweiger, the borough’s official historian, whose Flatlands home is a shrine to the long-vanished Brooklyn Dodgers (the team moved to Los Angeles in 1957).
     
Twitter
Bob Schneider
@Bobndc
Replying to @thegoodgodabove
I have an uncle named Saul. He should curse in Yiddish often, and have a bit of hypochondria. He should sound like he’s from Brooklyn, which is the most Jewish spot on Earth. Why am I helping the all-knowing with casting?
2:42 PM · Aug 7, 2018
   
The Times of Israel—The Blogs: David Walk
The Yiddish are coming! Part 2: The Hasidim
MAY 18, 2020, 9:11 AM
(...)
In 2018, Haddassah magazine, which has a Zionist bent, ran a story calling Brooklyn, the Most Jewish Place on Earth. Really?! That’s offensive. Especially when reading that in Yerushalayim. But statistically, Brooklyn is very Jewish and religious. It has over 600,000 Jews, over 40% are religious. It’s estimated that the number was 900,000 right after the War. It then went down for decades but has been rising again since the 90’s.
   
Twitter
Jewish History Soundbites
@JSoundbites
Great American Jewish Cities returns this week with perhaps the most Jewish place on earth.
Contact us regarding sponsorship opportunities!
(A song about Boro Park, Brooklyn.—ed.)
3:00 PM · Sep 13, 2020
   
Twitter
shortwhitegirl
@shortwhitegirl1
Replying to @rudhruletap @BJebrasky and 2 others
keep shifting blame.
youre actions the anger towards your community.
no one in brooklyn, the most jewish place on earth, cares that youre jewish!
6:36 PM · Oct 8, 2020
 
Twitter
Antar 🇮🇪 🇵🇸 🇨🇺 🇾🇪
@MarkGolden16
Antar 🇮🇪 🇵🇸 🇨🇺 🇾🇪
@MarkGolden16
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents in Brooklyn nicknamed “the most Jewish spot on Earth” home to the world’s largest Jewish community which with over 600,000 adherents living in the borough is greater than both Tel Aviv and Jerusalem combined.
5:58 PM · Jan 20, 2023

Posted by Barry Popik
New York CityNeighborhoods • Wednesday, March 15, 2023 • Permalink


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